Abroad|24/03/15

GERMANY: The number of occupational injuries and diseases declined between 2010 and 2013

Home > The news of EUROGIP and occupational risks in Europe > GERMANY: The number of occupational injuries and diseases declined between 2010 and 2013

The BAUA recently published a report on occupational safety and health between 2010 and 2013. The document provides detailed incidence rate statistics and analyses the cost of work disabilities.

According to the BAuA, 960,000 occupational injuries were reported in 2013, which represents a frequency rate of 24 injuries per 1000 full-time workers. This is the lowest rate recorded since the establishment of the Federal Republic. The number of fatal injuries also decreased, thus following the downward trend detected in the past few years. In 2013, 606 deaths were recorded, which represents a decline of about 10% since 2010.

The curve for occupational diseases has followed the curve for occupational injuries. In 2013, 2357 people died as a consequence of an occupational disease. That is 152 less than in 2010. Around two-thirds of the deaths are attributable to asbestos.

Compared with 2010, the number of benefit payments granted for reduction in working capacity fell 3%. We can note that benefits granted for mental and behavioural disorders are on the increase. In 2010, these conditions accounted for 39% of new benefit payments, compared with around 43% in 2013.

In 2013, work disabilities cost the German economy €103 billion.

To find out more (in German)

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