Abroad|30/01/15

GERMANY: Four new diseases recognized as work-related

Home > The news of EUROGIP and occupational risks in Europe > GERMANY: Four new diseases recognized as work-related

On 1 January a new official order came into force by virtue of which four diseases are recognized as work-related. The diseases are:

  • certain forms of “white skin cancer” (epidermoid carcinoma) or precancerous lesions of this cancer (multiple actinic keratoses) caused by years of exposure to the sun’s rays;
  • carpal tunnel syndrome (compression of a nerve at the point where it passes in an osteofibrous tunnel of the forearm) caused by certain manual activities;
  • hypothenar hammer syndrome and thenar hammer syndrome (lesion of the vessels of the hand occurring due to a force caused by a shock);
  • laryngeal cancer caused by sulphuric acid vapours.

This official order was adopted in early November 2014 further to the recommendation of the “Occupational Diseases” medical committee of the federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs. The persons concerned can claim rights to medical care from the injury insurance organization. In the event of a work disability or a permanent reduction in earning capacity, they are also entitled to cash benefits.

Download the text of the official order (in German)

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