Abroad|08/08/16

SPAIN: The UGT blames job insecurity and corporate indifference for the increase in occupational injuries

Home > The news of EUROGIP and occupational risks in Europe > SPAIN: The UGT blames job insecurity and corporate indifference for the increase in occupational injuries

The increase in recorded occupational injuries in Spain since the recovery of the economy coincides with a context of job insecurity together with the great indifference of many firms.

According to a report by the General Workers’ Union (UGT), the increase in the number of occupational injuries is directly related to “firms’ low interest in risk prevention”, because 31% of the accidents occurred at work stations which had not undergone an occupational risk assessment. The UGT considers that, if these firms had complied with the law, 140,232 injuries could have been prevented.

Moreover, the trade union says that the 2012 approval of the labour reform has had the effect of boosting temporary and part-time employment contracts, which are real catalysts for the rebound in the incidence rate. Between 2012 and 2015, the incidence rate for accidents occurring during the workday and resulting in a sick leave increased by 10.3%, while the rate of fatal injuries, for its part, climbed 12.3%.

To find out more (in Spanish)

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