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News|25/03/15

28 April: World Day for OSH

Home > The news of EUROGIP and occupational risks in Europe > 28 April: World Day for OSH

28avril2015On 28 April 2015, the World Day for safety and health at work (OSH) is devoted to “building a workplace safety culture”.

According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), which in 2003 undertook to observe each year a day dedicated to OSH, a workplace safety culture means that:

  • All levels comply with the right to a safe and healthy work environment;
  • Governments, employers and workers actively endeavour to ensure such a work environment by establishing a clearly defined system of rights, responsibilities and obligations;
  • The highest priority is assigned to the principle of prevention.

An interactive website allows each player concerned – ILO, government, employer, worker, OSH specialist, Social Security – to know how to take part in this global campaign in favour of a workplace safety culture.

According to the ILO, the global cost of compensation for occupational injuries and diseases breaks down as follows: MSDs 40%, cardiovascular diseases 16%, injuries 14%, respiratory problems 9%, disorders of the central nervous system 8%, mental disorders 7%, and skin tumours and conditions 3% respectively.

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