Abroad|30/08/21

DENMARK: skin disorders are the most frequently recognised occupational diseases

Home > The news of EUROGIP and occupational risks in Europe > DENMARK: skin disorders are the most frequently recognised occupational diseases

The Working Environment Council has launched a campaign that focuses on occupational skin diseases among young people. Every year, 2,500 Danes have their skin disease recognised as an occupational disease. In 9 out of 10 cases, they are victims of hand eczema.

According to the National Centre for Work Environment Research, one in three young people say they have had skin problems in the last 12 months. Some occupations are more affected than others: catering, care, nursing homes, hairdressing, mechanics, childcare and nurseries, cleaning. But what they all have in common is high humidity or repeated exposure to chemicals or allergens during the working day, or in some cases both.

The Work Environment Council’ campaign aims to inform young people under 30 about occupational dermatitis. It has published posters for each of the sectors particularly affected. In addition, it makes 5 recommendations on how the employer can contribute to preventing occupational dermatitis in employees:

1. Avoid harmful chemicals and wet hands
2. Organise the work so that employees move from one task to another
3. Make hand alcohol available as an alternative to hand washing
4. Ask employees to use gloves
5. Make hand cream available.

To find out more (in Danish)

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