Community news|10/11/16

Respirable crystalline silica on construction sites: a European guide for labour inspectors

Home > The news of EUROGIP and occupational risks in Europe > Respirable crystalline silica on construction sites: a European guide for labour inspectors

The Senior Labour Inspectors’ Committee (SLIC) and the Dutch Labour Inspectorate (SZW) have published a guide to help national labour inspectors manage the risks incurred by workers exposed to respirable crystalline silica on construction sites.

Respirable crystalline silica, which is very commonly used in workplaces in many sectors of industry and in construction, is known to cause serious diseases such as silicosis, chronic obstructive lung disease and lung cancer.

The guide provides general information on respirable crystalline silica, the health risks, the regulatory framework and control measures, supported by examples. In addition, 14 data sheets discuss priorities relating to respirable crystalline silica on construction sites.

Initially published in English, the guide will be available in all the official EU languages. According to Marga Zuurbier, member of the SLIC and head of the department of working conditions in the Dutch Labour Inspectorate, it “will help to create identical working conditions in all EU Member States. It will be useful not only to inspectors, but also to employers and workers”.

Guide

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