Community news|24/09/14

The EU-OSHA helps teachers speak of safety and health in the classroom

Home > The news of EUROGIP and occupational risks in Europe > The EU-OSHA helps teachers speak of safety and health in the classroom

At the start of the school year, the EU-OSHA presents “Napo for teachers“, a set of teaching tools for educational staff, designed to raise primary school children’s awareness of occupational safety and health (OSH) issues. With Napo, teachers have a real toolbox containing ideas for activities, videos, instructive data sheets, etc. Subjects such as safety signage or skin and back hazards can be easily dealt with in the classroom, within the framework of the existing curricula. “The aim is to help pupils adopt good safety and health habits, skills that will be useful for them throughout their working life”.

Napo is a cartoon character, a product of the imagination of a small group of information and communication professionals from six European OSH organizations: AUVA (Austria), DGUV (Germany), the HSE (United Kingdom), INAIL (Italy), INRS and SUVA (Switzerland). This awareness-raising film aims to reach all European employees, irrespective of their culture, language or work habits. There are currently about ten NAPO films.

See list of NAPO films

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